January 11th, 2016 | 3 Comments »

I had a wonderful busy weekend hanging out with artists, visiting galleries and studios, seeing art, and talking with artists over good food. It all started with a visit to the Museum of Anthropology to see (In)visible: The Spiritual World of Taiwan Through Contemporary Art.

As soon as we walked in my friends and I were all completely smitten with the Water Fairies Reproduction Project, which is the gorgeous installation pictured here created by Chiu Yu-Wen. It envelops the main hallway of the exhibition space beginning at the entrance of the show. It is made of a gauzy draped fabric and thousands of pieces of cut paper

Water Fairies Reproduction Project, 2004–2015, Chiu Yu-Wen-5

Water Fairies Reproduction Project, 2004–2015, Chiu Yu-Wen

We spent a long time looking at this piece from many angles, and enjoying the calm and peaceful atmosphere you experience while walking through it.

Water Fairies Reproduction Project, 2004–2015, Chiu Yu-Wen-4

Water Fairies Reproduction Project, 2004–2015, Chiu Yu-Wen-3

Water Fairies Reproduction Project, 2004–2015, Chiu Yu-Wen-2

I am inspired by this piece because I aspire to make paper based installations on this scale. It also feels like a rare opportunity to come across work like this in Vancouver, because most exhibitions spaces don’t have the space or mandate to display installations on this scale or type.

(In)visible: The Spiritual World of Taiwan Through Contemporary Art continues at the Museum of Anthropology until April 3, 2016.

November 16th, 2015 | Comments Off on CreativeMornings/Vancouver: Call for Audience Submissions

If you’ve ever wanted to speak at CreativeMornings/Vancouver now is the time to pitch a talk for the December 4th event. The deadline for submissions is Friday November 20th at noon, and you submit through the form below.

Posted in Vancouver
October 5th, 2015 | Comments Off on Getting Inside at Doors Open Vancouver

Doors Open Vancouver is an annual event put on by the City of Vancouver allowing people to visit city owned buildings and get a behind-the-scenes look. There are about eighteen locations involved for the day, ranging from theatres, to the public works yard, to the Stanley Park miniature train.

I visited two locations with my friend, Kai. We went for quality visits at two locations rather than trying to make it everywhere. We chose the Queen Elizabeth and Orpheum Theatres for our visits. Both theatres were set up for evening performances, which meant we got to see the set for Rigoletto at QE. Our timing was perfect to take part in a backstage tour as well and see the set up close.

Doors Open Vancouver
Lighting by Propellor Design

Doors Open Vancouver
The view from the stage

Doors Open Vancouver
The set for Rigoletto

Doors Open Vancouver

The Queen Elizabeth Theatre is modern while the Orpheum is more classic and full of ornate details from floor to ceiling. We chatting with an usher who has been working at the Orpheum for seventeen years, and knew much of the history of the place. She told us it was originally built as a vaudeville theatre in the 1920s.

Doors Open Vancouver
The spectacular view from the top tier seating

Doors Open Vancouver
Doors Open Vancouver
Plaster details along the walls near the stage

Doors Open Vancouver

Doors Open Vancouver
Doors Open Vancouver
Ornate patterned ceilings in the lobbies

I’ve visited both theatres for performances but it was nice to visit each location to see the building for its own sake. Next year I intend to go again and see other locations. I can’t wait.

Posted in Good things, Vancouver